6th Form Courses and Specifications

The JCoSS 6th Form, rated ‘Outstanding’ by OFSTED, has an exciting and varied range of A Level and Cambridge Technical courses on offer.

Art and Design A Level

Course Content

‘There is a strong instinct in me to draw and describe the things I love…a sort of instinct, like that of eating and drinking.’ (John Ruskin).  Art and Design is a mode of expression and communication, concerned with visual perception and aesthetic experience. It forms a language alongside those used by literary, mathematical, or scientific subjects. Most of the work for this course is studio based: through practical and contextual studies you will develop practical and theoretical understanding of materials, processes, resources and technologies, and understanding of continuity and change in different genres, styles and traditions. The course nurtures creative and intellectual skills for imaginative growth and is an excellent complement to many other areas of study; teaching you to be analytical, solve problems creatively and grow in cultural awareness.

The GCE two year course consists of Components 1 and 2 and minimum 1000 word Personal Study

Component 1: Personal Investigation (60% of the qualification).  This component incorporates three major elements: supporting studies, practical work and a personal study of a minimum 1000 words of continuous prose. These elements should be integrally connected. Students generate practical work, ideas and research from primary and contextual sources. They experiment with media and processes based on ideas developed from their own starting points, and develop and refine their ideas to produce practical outcomes. These are presented with supporting studies to explain their work.

Component 2: Externally Set Assignment (40% of the total qualification).  This component incorporates two major elements: preparatory studies and the 15 hour period of sustained focus.  The Externally Set Assignment represents the culmination of the GCE qualification allowing students to draw together all the knowledge, understanding and skills developed throughout. The paper gives one broad-based thematic starting point. The delivery of this unit is planned with teacher guidance during the preparatory period, encouraging independence in the development of ideas, intentions and response.

Assessment

All student work will be assessed against Assessment Objectives which are equally weighted in this qualification. Assessment is based on Components 1 and 2 and minimum 1000 word Personal Study with a 15 hour end of course exam.

Expectations

To be accepted onto the course you will need at least a Grade 6 at GCSE in Art. The course demands a willingness to contribute to lessons, experiment and take risks; an ability to sustain investigations; and a desire to develop visual skills, creativity and imagination. It is expected that you have some experience of using art materials and processes, together with some knowledge of contemporary and historical art and design. You will be set independent learning tasks every week and will also be expected to visit galleries, museums, workshops and studios. Most importantly, you should have a commitment to, and love for, the subject!

Examination Board: Edexcel.   Course Number: Art and Design – 3510.   Subject Code: Fine Art – 9FA0

 

Biology A Level

Course Content

1. Biological molecules
2. Cells
3. Organisms exchanges substances with their environment
4. Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms
5. Energy transfers in and between organisms
6. Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments
7. Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems
8. The control of gene expression

Biology is an A level course that is both academic and practical. The academic side of the course is very wide ranging, designed to incorporate all aspects of biology, from the traditional Zoology through to the very current Genetics. The course has a strong focus on the modern world of Science and Medicine, using many case studies from recent medical advances and scientific development. There is also a strong focus on Practical Biology, meaning that students will perform many experiments. These are challenging student’s prior experience of practical work, and along with the academic content, will provide a new and exciting challenge, as well as developing many skills such as experimental technique, logical and lateral thinking, analysis and evaluation.

Students explore the physiology of different systems e.g. digestion including the role of enzymes and the passive and active transport of substances across biological membranes. They study the effects of diseases of various causes on these systems. Knowledge of basic physiology will allow students to explain symptoms and also to interpret data relating to risk factors. The variety of living organisms is studied by looking at similarities and differences in biochemistry and cellular organisation. This includes the role of DNA, genetic and environmental factors and adaptations. The system of classifying organisms is investigated including recent approaches which draw on a wider range of evidence.

Humans are part of the ecological balance and their activities affect it both directly and indirectly. Consideration of these effects underpins the teaching of this section: it leads to an understanding that sustainability of resources depends on effectively managing the conflict between human needs and conservation. During the course students are expected to undertake a field trip. Students will develop an understanding of the ways in which organisms and cells control their activities. This leads to an appreciation of common ailments resulting from a breakdown of these control mechanisms and the use of DNA technology in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases.

Assessment

There are 3 exams with a combination of theory and practical papers.

Expectations

Minimum of Grade 7 (grade 8’s are highly recommended due to the demanding nature of the course) in all GCSE Science subjects which have been taken whether double award or triple award, plus a minimum of a Grade 6 in Maths. We strongly recommend that Biology is not the only Science/Maths subject that a student takes. If Biology is taken without another Science or Maths, we will require a minimum of grade 8’s in the GCSE modules in Biology, plus a Grade 7 in Maths.

Examination Board: AQA.  Course Number: 7402

 

Business Studies A Level

Course Content

Business Studies is the analysis of decision-making against a background of risk. We look at how business leaders take decisions in the areas of marketing, finance, human resources and production. We investigate the concept of leadership and we consider the factors which lead to business success and those which lead to failure. The subject is certainly a good choice for anyone interested in a business career but other students will also benefit from it. Most, if not all of us, will work in or for organisations and this subject affords students an understanding of how teams and organisations are managed.

The course consists of four themes:

Theme 1: Marketing and People.   This is the study of the marketing mix, meeting customer needs, analysing the market, managing people and what makes a good entrepreneur and what makes an effective leader.

Theme 2: Managing Business Activities.  Students learn about how finance is raised, financial planning and management, resource management and the external influences on business.

Theme 3: Business Decisions and Strategy.  Students learn about the formation of objectives and strategy, the way decisions are taken and the influences on decisions. Also included is the study of the ways businesses grow, ways to assess competitiveness and the ways in which change is managed.

Theme 4: Global Business.  This theme explores the impact of globalisation and the ways in which businesses can expand and market themselves overseas. It also covers the study of multinationals.

Assessment

Paper 1: Marketing, People and Global Businesses. Will be a 2 hour written examination worth 35% of the final grade. It covers Themes 1 and 4. It will include one data response question and one extended open-response essay question.

Paper 2: Business Activities, Decisions and Strategy. Will be a 2-hour written examination worth 35% of the final grade. It will cover Themes 2 and 3. It will include one data response question and one extended open-response essay question.

Paper 3: Investigating Business in a Competitive Environment.  Will be a 2-hour written examination worth 30% of the final grade. It will cover material from all four themes and will be based on a pre-released context document from the exam board. It will include one data response question and one extended open-response essay question.

Expectations

To be accepted onto the course students need at least a Grade 6 at GCSE in Maths and English Language. Students need to be thoughtful and prepared to participate in discussion. An interest in the world of business is essential. Keeping up-to-date with developments in business news is also highly recommended. A clear written style is important and this subject should help students develop skills in data-analysis as well as essay writing.

Examination Board: Edexcel.  Course Number: 9BS0

 

Business Cambridge Technical

Course Content

The Extended Certificate is for students who are interested in learning about the business sector alongside other fields of study, with a view to progressing to a wide range of higher education courses, not necessarily in business-related subjects. The Business course covers a wide range of topic areas in order to offer students a breadth of knowledge which will enable students to go on to university or employment based routes.

This course is offered as a single (1 A Level) and a double (2 A Levels) but this is subject to demand,

You will study a range of topics, including:

• The Business Environment
• Working in Business
• Business Decisions
• Customers and Communication (diploma only)
• Marketing and Market Research
• Marketing Strategy (diploma only)
• Marketing Campaign (diploma only)
• Change Management (diploma only)
• Principles of Project Management
• Delivering a Business Project (diploma only)

Assessment

The majority of the units are assessed by producing project-based work throughout the course. For diploma students, four of the ten units will be assessed by examinations. For extended certificate students, two of the five units are assessed by exams.

Expectations

Students need to be self-motivated and able to work on extended research projects. Organisation and presentation skills are important as is an enthusiasm to learn about business. Links to organisations and the opportunity to undertake work experience will prove very useful in helping students relate what they study to actual practice.

Examination Board: OCR

Qualification: Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Certificate/ Diploma in Business

 

Chemistry A Level

Course Content

Physical Chemistry: Atomic structure; Amount of substance; Bonding; Energetics; Kinetics; Chemical equilibria and Le Chatelier’s principle; Oxidation reduction and redox equations; Thermodynamics; Rate equations; Equilibrium constant for homogeneous systems; Electrode potentials and electrochemical cells; Acids and bases.

Inorganic Chemistry: Periodicity; Group 2, the alkaline earth metals; Group 7, the halogens; Properties of Period 3 elements and their oxides; Transition metals; Reactions of ions in aqueous solution. Organic Chemistry: Introduction to organic chemistry; Alkanes; Halogenoalkanes; Alkenes; Alcohols; Organic analysis; Optical isomerism; Aldehydes and ketones; Carboxylic acids and derivatives; Aromatic chemistry; Amines; Polymers, Amino acids, proteins and DNA; Organic synthesis; Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; Chromatography.

Studies explore the fundamental principles that form the basis of Chemistry: Atomic Structure, the Mole and Bonding.  Organic Chemistry is introduced and then extended and developed to include Alcohols and Analytical Techniques.  Students will then look more deeply at principles that underpin chemistry, and their application. These include Energetics, Kinetics, Equilibria and Redox Reactions. We also undertake a study of the Periodic Table, focusing on Group 7 (Halogens) and Group 2 (Alkaline Earth Metals) and how they are extracted. We will develop the concept of Physical Chemistry, treating Kinetic and Equilibria quantitatively. The theory behind Acids and Bases is demonstrated using titrations (practical technique) and the study of organic chemistry is extended to include carbonyl groups, aromatic compounds and polymers. It also includes a study of spectroscopic techniques to solve identification problems. The full Chemistry A-Level includes the study of thermodynamics, construction of Born-Haber cycles, enthalpy/entropy calculations, Periodicity, including transition Metals, Redox Equilibria and Reactions of Inorganic Compounds in Aqueous Solution. These will be supported by numerous practical opportunities.

Assessment

There are 3 exams with a combination of theory and practical papers.

Expectations

Minimum of Grade 7 (grade 8’s are highly recommended due to the demanding nature of the course) in all GCSE Science subjects which have been taken whether double award or triple award; plus a minimum of a Grade 7 in Maths. It is recommended, but not essential, to be studying A level Maths. We strongly recommend that Chemistry is not the only Science/Maths subject that a student takes. If Chemistry is taken without another Science or Maths, we will require a minimum of grade 8’s in the GCSE modules in Chemistry.

Examination Board: AQA.    Course Number: 7405

Classical Civilisation A Level

Course Content

By studying Classical Civilisation A Level you will gain a broad and coherent insight into the literature and culture of the classical world and you will form an understanding of the profound ways in which the Greeks and Romans have shaped our modern world. You will engage closely with the oldest surviving works of literature in the Western literary canon, the origins of democracy, the birth of theatre, art and artistry, developing a wide range of analytical skills in the process. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required; all source material will be in English translation.

Assessment

Paper 1: The world of the hero (40% of A level).  Written exam: 2 hours 20 minutes
You will study in depth one of either Homer’s Iliad or Odyssey, as well as Virgil’s Aeneid, developing knowledge and understanding of the epics themselves, the way in which they were composed, and the religious, cultural and social values and beliefs that underpin them.

Paper 2: Culture and the arts (30% of A level).  Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
You will study visual and material culture as well as literature focused on one of the following topics:
• Greek theatre
• Imperial image
• Invention of the barbarian
• Greek art

Paper 3: Beliefs and ideas (30% of A level).  Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
You will study an area of Classical thought, in combination with either the study of literature or visual/material culture focused on one of the following topics:
• Greek religion
• Love and relationships
• Politics of the Late Republic
• Democracy and the Athenians

Expectations

To be accepted onto the course, you need at least a Grade 6 in English Literature and a Grade 6 in a Humanities subject at GCSE. The course demands good essay writing skills and a willingness to contribute to discussion. You will be set independent learning tasks each week and you will also be expected to carry out a large amount of self-study.

Examination Board: OCR.   Course Number: H408

 

Computer Science A Level

Course Content

Computer Science is a creative and exciting subject which challenges students to use their ingenuity to solve problems using code. The academic principles of computing are applied to real-world systems developing computational thinking, skills of system design and the understanding of the power and limits of human and machine intelligence.

The A-level course consists of the following topics

Computing Principles covers topics such as operating systems, data types and structures, Boolean algebra and legal and ethical issues. Algorithms and Problem Solving covers computational thinking, programming techniques, software development methodologies, pattern recognition, abstraction and decompositions and algorithms.

The programming project challenges students to solve a complex user-driven problem by designing, implementing and evaluating a solution. Students will explore a range of programming languages such as Python, JavaScript and Visual Basic.

Assessment

Assessment at A level is by way of two two-and-a-half hour exams and one project.
Paper 1: Computer systems
Paper 2: Algorithms and programming
Project: Programming
Each paper is worth 40% of the final grade and the project is worth 20%.

Expectations

To be accepted onto the course students need at least a Grade 6 in GCSE Maths. The course will require mathematical skills when solving problems. GCSE Computing is not necessary but will be helpful. The course demands good levels of problem-solving and creativity. You will be expected to develop your programming skills independently. Students who choose this course should have spent some time learning to code to determine whether it is a subject they will enjoy. This might be by learning code in languages such as Python via interactive websites such as Codecademy and Code Avengers.

Examination Board: OCR.    Course Number: H446

 

Design and Technology A Level

Course Content

A course in Design and Technology offers a unique opportunity for students to identify and solve real problems by designing and making products or systems in a wide range of contexts relating to their personal interests. Design and Technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. It encourages students to use creativity and imagination when applying iterative design processes to develop and modify designs, and to design and make prototypes that solve real world problems, considering their own and others’ needs, wants, aspirations and values. Students will be required to identify market needs and opportunities for new products, initiate and develop design solutions, and make and test prototypes.

Learners should acquire subject knowledge in design and technology, including how a product can be developed through the stages of prototyping, realisation and commercial manufacture.

This A Level course consists of 2 components:

Component One – Written Examination (50% of qualification, 3 hours). This paper will contain three sections which will assess students’ knowledge and understanding of:

• technical principles
• designing and making principles
along with their ability to:
• analyse and evaluate design decisions and wider issues in design and technology.

Section A questions require short answers and should demonstrate breadth of knowledge
Section B questions require more detailed responses, demonstrating breadth and depth of knowledge
Section C questions require extended, essay style responses, demonstrating depth of knowledge. The quality of written communication in answers will also be considered in Section C.

Component 2 – Non-exam Assessment (50% of qualification, maximum 80 Hours).  A sustained design and make project, based on a brief developed by the student, assessing the candidate’s ability to:

• identify, investigate and outline design possibilities
• design and make prototypes
• analyse and evaluate design decisions and wider issues in design and technology.

Assessment

Assessment for this A Level consists of 1 examination paper and 1 non-exam assessment component. The examinations are externally assessed by WJEC Eduqas and the non-exam assessment is marked by the centre and moderated by the WJEC Eduqas.

Expectations

To be accepted onto the course you will need at least a Grade 6 or B grade at GCSE in Design & Technology. Design and Technology requires a genuine interest in solving problems through innovative and creative solutions. You need to be able to work independently and sustain an investigation. Independent attendance at museums and exhibitions is essential to inspire ideas and keep up to date with current materials and technologies.

Examination Board: WJEC.    Course Number: 603/1178/2

 

Digital Media Cambridge Technical (Diploma)

Examination Board – OCR

The Diploma course is equivalent to two A level consists of 12 units of study.

Course Content

The Cambridge Technical in Digital Media is a vocational course which gives students the opportunity to develop their portfolio of work-related skills. It is excellent preparation for employment post sixth form but works equally well to support a student looking to apply for university.

Media is ever-changing with new technology leading its development. You will explore a range of digital media and moving image industries. You will devise exciting and creative solutions to projects, through the use of a variety of video and digital media technology. You will be given the opportunity to specialise in digital media or moving image in a variety of projects.

The course will focus on:

• Film production

• Structure and analysis of the media industry

• Design using software packages including Photoshop and InDesign

•TV, radio, gaming and magazine industries
• Multimedia editing using Final Cut Pro

• Photography, page layout and design.

• Advertising and Marketing
• Animation
• The impact of Social Media
•  Journalism
•  Interactive media
•  Comics and graphic novel storytelling

On the course you will:

• Create a range of digital media solutions through a variety of projects

• Make posters, title sequences, films and web pages

• Research current industry practices and visit TV studios and screenings

• Make your own film products

• Improve your communication skills

• Be offered opportunities for work-based learning and work experience.

Assessment

This courses contain a number of units of study assessed by the school, and a further 3 units that can take the form of a task or written exam that is set and marked externally by the exam board.

Expectations

Students need to be self-motivated and able to work on extended research and practical projects. Organisation and presentation skills are important as is an enthusiasm to learn about and create Media.

Digital Media Cambridge Technical (Extended Certificate)

Examination Board – OCR

The Extended Certificate course is equivalent to one A level consists of 6 units of study.

Course Content

The Cambridge Technical in Digital Media is a vocational course which gives students the opportunity to develop their portfolio of work-related skills. It is excellent preparation for employment post sixth form but works equally well to support a student looking to apply for university.

Media is ever-changing with new technology leading its development. You will explore a range of digital media and moving image industries. You will devise exciting and creative solutions to projects, through the use of a variety of video and digital media technology. You will be given the opportunity to specialise in digital media or moving image in a variety of projects.

The course will focus on:

  • Film production
  • Structure and analysis of the media industry
  • Design using software packages including Photoshop and InDesign
  • TV, radio, gaming and magazine industries
    • Multimedia editing using Final Cut Pro
  • Photography, page layout and design.
  • Advertising and Marketing

On the course you will:

  • Create a range of digital media solutions through a variety of projects
  • Make posters, title sequences, films and web pages
  • Research current industry practices and visit TV studios and screenings
  • Make your own film products
  • Improve your communication skills
  • Be offered opportunities for work-based learning and work experience.

Assessment

All Technical courses contain a number of units of study assessed by the school, and a further 2 units that can take the form of a task or written exam that is set and marked externally by the exam board.

Expectations

Students need to be self-motivated and able to work on extended research and practical projects. Organisation and presentation skills are important as is an enthusiasm to learn about and create Media.

Drama and Theatre Studies A Level

Course Content

The course focuses on working with plays from the point of view of a director, designer and performer. As well as developing performing and analytical skills, students acquire an understanding of drama art within a local, national and international context. Throughout the course students deepen and expand their experience of what theatre is; drawing on their involvement with the Shakespeare Schools Festival (November) and the JCoSS Fringe Festival (July). The course gives the opportunity to work in an interdisciplinary way to celebrate innovative and imaginative theatre practice.

Component 1: Drama and Theatre

• Knowledge and understanding of drama and theatre
• Study of two set plays, one chosen from List A and one chosen from List B.
• Analysis and evaluation of the work of live theatre makers.

Component 2: Creating original drama (practical)

• Process of creating devised drama
• Performance of devised drama (students may contribute as performer, designer or director).
• Devised piece must be influenced by the work and methodologies of one prescribed practitioner.

Component 3: Making theatre (practical)

• Practical exploration and interpretation of three extracts, each taken from a different play. Methodology of a prescribed practitioner must be applied to Extract 3. Extract 3 is to be performed as a final assessed piece (students may contribute as performer, designer or director).
• Reflective report analysing and evaluating theatrical interpretation of all three extracts.

Assessment

Component 1: 3 hours written exam, open book, 80 marks, 40% of A Level
Component 2: Working notebook (40 marks), devised performance (20 marks), 30% of A Level
Component 3: Performance of Extract 3 (40 marks), Reflective report (20 marks), 30% of A Level

Expectations

To be accepted onto the course students usually need at least a Grade 6 at GCSE in Drama and at least a Grade 5 in English Language.   Students may be asked to demonstrate their practical ability to gain access to the course.  Independent learning tasks will be set as practice for the written examination.  Students will also be expected to maintain consistently a journal of the practical work, in order to produce the exploration notes and the supporting written evidence document. Independent attendance at as much live theatre as possible is necessary in order to research, understand and develop the craft of theatre directing and design and to meet the requirements of the written examination.

Examination Board: AQA.    Course Number: 7262

 

Economics A Level

Course Content

Economics is the study of how society manages the challenge of scarcity. We have infinite wants and needs but only finite resources. What should we make and who should get what? Economics lies behind many of the headlines that we read every day; it is clearly a significant factor in the worlds of politics, business and global development. It considers key issues such as poverty and environmental damage. The study of Economics also helps students develop their skills of analysing and solving problems. It is an engaging discipline which helps students develop their ability to reason and develop arguments.

The A-level course consists of the following topics: Microeconomics covers the fundamental economic problem of scarcity given society’s resources. It covers the role of supply and demand in price determination. Students also investigate the impact of competition in business on market outcomes – the way in which monopolies, for example affect consumers and other businesses. The study of income distribution and inequality as well as the way in which markets fail conclude the topics for this section.

This topic allows us to investigate questions such as “Why are house prices so high?”, “Can pollution effectively be controlled?” and “Should governments interfere with markets?”
Macroeconomics covers the objectives of government policy. Students investigate how economic performance is measured, finance markets, fiscal and monetary policies and the international economy.
We investigate questions such as: “What are the consequences of unemployment?”, “What are the problems caused by inflation and deflation?” and “How are we affected by the world economy?” This topic helps us look at the role of government and we consider its use of taxation and public spending to manage the economy and achieve its objectives.

Assessment

Assessment at A-level is by way of three exams. 
Papers 1 and 2 are each 2 hours long and comprise multiple choice, short-answer, data response and extended open-response questions. Paper 1 is microeconomics and Paper 2 is macroeconomics.
Paper 3 is a synoptic paper which covers the whole syllabus. It is 2 hours. It comprises data response and extended open-response questions
Papers 1 and 2 are each worth 35% of the final grade. Paper 3 is worth 30%.

Expectations

To be accepted onto the course students need at least a Grade 6 at GCSE in Maths and English Language.  The course demands good skills of analysis, a willingness to contribute to discussion and the ability to express yourself clearly and precisely in writing. You will be set independent learning tasks every week and will also be expected to carry out your own reading – a quality newspaper every day to keep abreast of Economics issues in the news, and academic books on the subject as well. An interest in current affairs is ideal.

Examination Board: Edexcel.    Course Number: 9EC0

 

English Language A Level

Course Content

Do you enjoy studying non – literary texts, picking apart language in detail and producing your own creative writing?

A-level English Language offers opportunities for you to develop your subject expertise by engaging creatively and critically with a wide range of texts and discourses. You will create your own texts and reflect critically on how you produced them, while analysing the texts produced by others. You will explore the study of English language both as a way of communicating and as an entity that develops and changes across contexts. Language is seen as a creative tool for expression and social connection, as well as for individual processing. You will draw on the academic field of linguistics to study language as a symbolic system used to assert power in society. You will develop the skills needed to pursue lines of enquiry, debate different views, and work independently to research aspects of language in use, all of which are required for both progression to university and enhanced employability.

Assessment

Paper 1 : Language, the individual and society (40% of A Level)

Written exam: 2hours 30minutes

Explore a range of texts and look at how language varies and how different contexts are represented.
Compare and analyse two texts in the exam using linguistic theory and terminology.
Complete a discursive essay on children’s language development, based on theories of this field of linguistics.
 

Paper 2: Language, Diversity and Change (40% of A Level)

Written Exam: 2 hours 30 minutes

Explore how and why language diversifies and changes across different sections of society through an evaluative essay.
Analysis of how texts about the same topic show these changes. You will analyse how language is used to present ideas, attitudes and opinions.
The exam includes a directed writing task linked to the topic of the exam paper.(Creative writing).
Non – Exam Assessment: Language in Action (20% of A Level)

Coursework: 3,500 words

A language investigation based on data that you have collected
A piece of original writing and commentary
 

Expectations

To be accepted onto the course students need at least a Grade 6 at both English Language and English Literature GCSE. The course demands good essay writing skills and a willingness to contribute to discussion. You will be expected to prepare aspects of texts for presentation in class. You need to enjoy reading and creative writing, and be willing to read independently beyond the texts we look at together in class.

English Literature A Level

Course Content

Do you enjoy reading, discussing what you have read, thinking about texts in different contexts and writing about your interpretations?

English Literature offers you the opportunity to study in detail a range of texts taken from different time periods and across literary genres. You are encouraged to analyse texts from a variety of perspectives and to debate the meaning of texts in order to arrive at a real understanding of them. English Literature combines especially well with History, Politics and social sciences, though it also provides a useful balance to Science or Maths. As an A-Level student of English Literature, you will develop a range of highly academic skills, such as critical thinking and constructing arguments, which are regarded extremely highly by Universities and potential employers.

Assessment

Paper 1: Love through the Ages: Shakespeare and Poetry (40% of A Level mark).  The aim of this topic area is to explore aspects of a central literary theme as seen through the ages.  Written exam: 3 hours (open book for one section only).   You will study three texts: one Shakespeare play, one prose text and one pre-1900 poetry anthology

Paper 2: Texts in Shared Contexts: Modern Literature from 1945 to the present day (40% of A Level mark).  The aim of this topic area is to encourage students to explore aspects of literature connected through a period of time.  Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes (open book).  You will study three texts, one poetry, one prose and one drama, one of which must be written post-2000. You will also answer a question on an unseen extract.

Paper 3: Independent Critical Study: Texts across Time (20% of A Level mark).  The focus of this component is for independent study and autonomous reading.

Coursework – 2500 words. You will write a comparative critical study of two texts: one must be pre-1900 and two different authors must be considered.

Expectations

To be accepted onto the course, you will need at least a Grade 6 at both English Language and English Literature GCSE. The course demands good essay writing skills and a willingness to contribute to discussion. You will be expected to prepare aspects of the texts for presentation in class. You need to enjoy reading and be willing to read widely, beyond the set texts, to explore the topics being studied.

Examination Board: AQA.    Course Number: 7712

 

Film Studies A Level

Course Content

This course of study encourages students to watch, engage critically with and explore a wide range of film; to develop and sustain confident, personal responses to film via textual analysis; and to enjoy a variety of critically acclaimed films across the major genres. These include films from different cultural perspectives, films from the Silent Era to the present day, and different forms of film, including documentary, shorts and experimental.

The course consists of a mix of examined and practical non-examined assessments (NEA) which is essentially coursework.  Practical (NEA) work offers students the opportunity to produce a short film together with an evaluation.  Students are required to study a range of critically recognised and culturally significant set films from a range of different national cinemas, contexts and film forms (including documentary, short and experimental). The micro elements of film form (cinematography, mise-en-scène, editing and sound) are still the primary tools of film analysis. Performance has been introduced as an additional micro- element.

Students must study set films from a range of time periods from the silent era to present day as well as aesthetics and a range of specified critical approaches, including two filmmakers’ theories on film.

Assessment

The A Level is assessed via two examined assessments lasting two hours and a practical (NEA) production.
Unit 1: Film History (examined component) is worth 35% of the total A Level.
Unit 2: Critical Approaches to Film (examined component) is worth 35% of the total A level.
Unit 3: Making Short Film (non-examined component) is worth 30% of the total A level.

Expectations

To be accepted onto the course students need at least a Grade 6 in English Language GCSE.  The course requires students to work independently and creatively. You will already have a keen interest in film, either through watching films on a regular basis, producing them, or both! You will be expected to approach tasks analytically and to be able to express your ideas clearly in writing.

Examination Board: OCR    Course Number: H410

 

French A Level

Course Content

3.1.1 Aspects of French-speaking society: current trends; 3.1.2 Aspects of French-speaking society: current issues; 3.3 Grammar; 3.4.1 Literary Texts & Films; 3.5 Individual Research Project

A-Level French offers students the opportunity to develop an in-depth knowledge of the language through the exploration of Francophone culture and society. The curriculum demands students to develop knowledge and an informed opinion on a variety of cultural and social themes in relation to Francophone countries. This varied and challenging course incorporates the study of two literary works from the fields of Literature and Film. Using the linguistic skills developed in Year 1 students will learn how to analyse and debate the set works in French. In Year 2 students will embark upon an independent research project which allows them to choose a topic of interest related to the key themes of the course and study this in greater detail. The research project will be a unique opportunity to develop individual interests and must be distinct from the topics chosen by others on the course. A comprehensive grammar programme underpins the topic areas to enable students to develop the linguistic skills to use the language independently. Completion of the course will enable students to express their ideas verbally and in writing with a high level of proficiency.

Assessment

Paper 1 : Listening, Reading & Writing (2½ hours)
• 3.1.1 Aspects of French-speaking society: current trends
• 3.1.2 Aspects of French-speaking society: current issues
• 3.3 Grammar

Questions will require some translation into French and English, summaries in French of written and spoken passages

Paper 2 : Writing (2 Hours)

• Literary Works: Students will be required to write two essays on each of the set works studied. Set works are selected from a prescribed list. Each essay should be at least 300 words in length with no access to the texts or dictionaries.

Paper 3: Speaking (21-23 Minutes)

• 5 Minutes preparation time
• Discussion of a stimulus card based on the themes from Aspects of French-speaking society (5-6 minutes)
• Presentation (2 minutes) and follow discussion of the Individual Research Project (9-10 minutes)

Expectations

To be accepted onto this course, a minimum of a Grade 6 at GCSE in this subject is required. However, it is highly recommended that students have a Grade 7 or above. The course demands good essay writing skills and a willingness to contribute to discussion in a foreign language. You will be set independent learning tasks every week and will also be expected to carry out your own reading in French. Students will be expected to read independently, eg. a French newspaper to keep abreast of current affairs. They will also be expected to spend time each week learning vocabulary and practising new grammar structures

Examination Board: AQA.   Course Number: 7652

 

Geography A Level

Course Content

The modern world is a rapidly changing one, whose dynamics and issues are multifaceted. From the global to the local, Geography allows you to explore these world issues as active enquirers. It seeks to understand the interaction between human beings and their environments as well as the interdependence of places, people and power. Geography’s interdisciplinary strands are economic, scientific and political. It is a course for those with a natural curiosity equipping you with a rigorous and varied skill set.

Paper 1
Tectonic Processes and Hazards, Landscape Systems, Processes and Change – including optional sub-topics from which students choose one from two: 2A: Glaciated Landscapes and Change or 2B: Coastal Landscapes and Change, The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity, The Carbon Cycle and Energy.

Paper 2
Globalisation, Shaping Places – including optional sub-topics from which students choose one from two: 4A Regenerating Places or 4B Diverse Places, Superpowers, Global Development and Connections – including optional sub-topics from which students choose one from two: Health, Human Rights and Intervention or Migration, Identity and Sovereignty.

Paper 3
The specification contains three synoptic themes within the compulsory content areas: Players, Attitudes and actions, Futures and uncertainties.

Assessment

Paper 1: Written examination: 2 hours and 15 minutes; 30% of the qualification
Paper 2: Written examination: 2 hours and 15 minutes; 30% of the qualification
Paper 3: Written examination: 2 hours and 15 minutes; 20% of the qualification

Coursework 20% of the qualification – A written independent investigation of 3000–4000 words.

Expectations

Entry requirement for Geography A level is a Grade 6 at GCSE Geography. If students have not taken Geography at GCSE a Grade 6 in Maths and English Language is required. The course demands good essay writing skills and mathematical aptitude. You will be set independent learning tasks every week and will also be expected to carry out a large amount of self-study. This will include; keeping abreast of geographical issues in the news, as well as academic books, journals and websites on the subject.

Examination Board: Edexcel.   Course Number: 9GE01

 

Health and Social Care Cambridge Technical

Course Content

This course aims to provide you with some of the knowledge, skills and practical experience to pursue a career or further study in health, social care and child care. 

The Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma is equivalent to two A-Levels and consists of the following units:
• Building positive relationships in health and social care
• Equality, diversity and rights in health and social care
• Health, safety and security in health and social care
• Anatomy and physiology for health and social care
• Infection control
• Personalisation and a person-centred approach to care
• Safeguarding
• Creative activities for children and young people
• Nutrition for health
• Promote positive behaviour
• Promoting health and wellbeing
• Principles of youth work practice

Assessment

This course suits people who are interested in working and developing careers with vulnerable people of all ages and abilities in a health and social care capacity. Skills and knowledge will be assessed through both externally set and assessed exams as well as internally set and assessed assignments. The internally assessed assignments will include a number of different types of assessment methods which may include presentations, reports, posters, information booklets and case studies.

Expectations

Health and social care is one of the largest industry sectors and offers a huge choice of careers. Future opportunities could include careers such as health care assistant, midwife, nurse, social worker, support worker, youth worker & higher education/university courses such as early childhood studies. As such, we would expect students to be self-motivated, with an interest in and enthusiasm for understanding the practical nature of health, social care, child care and youth work.

Examination Board: OCR

Qualification: Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma in Health and Social Care

 

History A Level

Course Content

The past is a fascinating world which holds the key to understanding the present. This course covers international aspects of History as well as early modern British History, and requires students to be historians rather than ‘history students’. As such they must be highly analytical, critical consumers of evidence, prepared to ask questions, argue and debate to arrive at their own judgements. Unsurprisingly, history graduates are well-equipped for jobs in politics, law and the media and, beyond this, ready and educated to be well informed members of society.

The course consists of 3 components:
Component 1: Breadth Study: The Tudors 1485-1603
The Breadth Study requires the study of an extended period and enables students to develop secure understanding of the process of change over time. Students will consider key social, economic, political and religious changes in England from Henry VII to Elizabeth I, to assess the extent of continuity and change in this dramatic period of England’s history. Students will study the development and modernisation of the monarchy, English foreign policy and the course of religious changes during the English reformation. Underpinning this is the study of the role of key individuals and groups and how they were affected by these developments.

Component 2: Depth Study: France in Revolution 1774-1815
This option provides for the study in-depth of a key period of history which was to change the relationship between the ruler and the governed, not only in France but throughout Europe and, in time, the wider world. A study of France in Revolution embraces concepts such as absolutism, enlightenment, constitutionalism, democracy, republic and dictatorship. It also encourages consideration of issues such as the relationship between rulers and the ruled, the place of the Church in the State, the power of the people and promotes reflection on what makes and perpetuates revolution. Topics of study will include the causes of the French Revolution, including a study of key political figures including Louis XVI, Marie-Antoinette and Robespierre. Students will track the early developments of the Revolution, focusing on internal and external threats leading to the reign of the Terror. In their second year students will consider the reasons for the emergence of Napoleon as leader of France and analyse and evaluate his key achievements within France and Europe.

Component 3: Historical Investigation
Students will be required to submit a 3,500 word Historical Investigation based on a development or issue which has been subject to different historical interpretations. Students may study a specific issue in depth over a short period of time, or a broader theme and/or development over a longer period. Through undertaking the Historical Investigation, students will develop an enhanced understanding of the nature and purpose of history as a discipline and how historians work. They will broaden their study of the past whilst having the opportunity to study a specific issue in great depth.

Assessment

Component 1: 2½ hour exam (40% of A-Level)
Component 2: 2½ hour exam (40% of A-Level)
Component 3: 3500 word coursework essay (20% of A-Level)

Expectations

Entry requirement for History A level is a Grade 6 at GCSE History. If students have not taken History at GCSE a Grade 6 in English Literature and Language is required (or only English Language if Literature not studied at GCSE). The course demands good essay writing skills and a willingness to contribute to discussion. You will be set independent learning tasks every week and will also be expected to carry out a large amount of self-study.

Examination Board: AQA    Course Number: 7042

 

Latin A Level

Course Content

A-level Latin allows students to extend their language skills as well as developing an understanding and appreciation for the literature, culture and society of ancient Rome. Students build their knowledge of vocabulary and linguistic structures through reading and studying prose and verse texts in Latin. The course develops a high level of linguistic competence, requiring students to translate unseen texts with accuracy as well as consideration of the genre. There is also the opportunity for prose composition. Study of literature extends beyond the GCSE in both breadth and depth, with both prose and verse texts studied in Latin and English and analysed in detail.

Assessment

Component 1: Unseen Translation 33%.  Written exam: 1 hours 45 minutes.  This paper will test knowledge of vocab, accidence and syntax through translation of an unseen passage of both Ovid (verse) and Livy (prose) into English.

Component 2: Prose Composition or Comprehension 17%.  Written exam: 1 hour 15 minutes.  Students will show their linguistic competence by either answering comprehension questions on an unseen passage of Latin, or translating a short passage of English into Latin.

Component 3: Prose Literature 25%.  Written exam: 2 hours.   This component requires the study of a selection of prose literature in the original Latin with some parts in English to aid context. In the exam students will translate passages of text as well as responding at length to questions regarding the use of language, context and interpretation of the texts.

Component 4: Verse Literature 25%.  Written exam: 2 hours.  This component requires the study of a selection of verse in the original Latin with some parts in English to aid context. In the exam students will translate passages of text as well as responding at length to questions regarding the use of language, context and interpretation of the texts.  Authors include Virgil, Ovid and Horace

Expectations

To be accepted onto the course, you need at least a Grade 6 in Latin at GCSE. The course demands a good knowledge of Latin vocabulary, accidence and syntax as well as the ability to respond analytically to Latin texts. You will be set independent learning tasks each week and you will also be expected to carry out a large amount of self-study including vocabulary learning and practising of new grammar.

Examination Board: OCR    Course Number: H443

 

Maths A Level

Course Content

Mathematics at A level provides an unrivalled opportunity to learn habits of clear analytical thought, sophisticated problem-solving techniques, and a developed awareness of the idea of proof. The study of Mathematics gives students fluency in a universal language, and the capacity to present ideas with clarity, precision and economy.  It combines well with many other subjects – supporting the study of empirical and social sciences, and complementing the study of the arts.

A Level course (Pure mathematics 1, pure mathematics 2 and statistics and mechanics)

Pure Mathematics 1:  This module consolidates and extends the algebra taught at GCSE. Students are introduced to Calculus for the first time.  The content comprises algebra and functions, coordinate geometry in the (x,y) plane, sequences and series, proof, trigonometry, differentiation and integration.

Pure Mathematics 2:  This module builds upon the topics taught in Pure Mathematics 1 and introduces new and more challenging concepts in algebra and functions, coordinate geometry, sequences and series, proof, trigonometry, differentiation and integration.

Statistics and Mechanics:  Statistics requires students to be analytical, to interpret data and make inferences. This unit studies mathematical models in probability and statistics, representation and summary of data, probability, statistical distributions and hypothesis testing. Mechanics looks at how and why physical objects move and behave as they do. This module studies mathematical models in mechanics, kinematics of particles moving in straight lines, moments and forces and Newton’s laws.

Assessment

The examinations consist of a 120-minute paper for each module. They contain 100 marks each. Calculators can be used in all papers.

Expectations

To be a successful candidate in Mathematics you need to above all enjoy the subject. A Grade 7 in Mathematics at GCSE is necessary to be accepted onto the course.

Examination Board: Edexcel    Course Number: 9MA0

 

Further Maths A Level

Course Content

Further Mathematics at A level provides students with an in depth insight into the world of complex numbers, differential equations and the kinematics of particles. Through the use of clear analytical and mathematical problem solving techniques students will be able to present solutions in a clear and accurate manner. In combination with Sciences and Technology, students will equip themselves with a powerful tool with which to tackle higher education at any university.

Course (Paper 1, Paper2, Paper 3 and Paper 4)

Paper 1: Further Core Pure Mathematics 1

Students are introduced to complex numbers (as having both real and imaginary parts). The use of parametric equations is taught as an alternative to the standard Cartesian axes. A study of matrices and a variety of series are studied together with proof by mathematical induction to complete the course.

Paper 2: Further Core Pure Mathematics 2

Students study further complex numbers and use them to solve differential equations. Introduction to polar coordinates and inequalities allow the students to find new routes to tackle seemingly unanswerable problems.

Papers 3 and 4: Option

These papers are option based and consist of modules containing Further Pure and Further Mechanics.

The content for these are as follows:

• Further Pure: Further calculus, further differential equations, coordinate systems, further vectors and inequalities
• Further Mechanics: Momentum and impulse, collisions, centres of mass, work and energy

Assessment

The examinations consist of a 90-minute paper for each module. They contain 75 marks each. Calculators can be used for all papers.

Expectations

To be a successful candidate in Further Mathematics you need to above all enjoy the subject. A Grade 8 or 9 in Mathematics at GCSE is necessary to be accepted to the course as much of the work taught is given to students to tackle outside of their classroom.

Examination Board: Edexcel.    Course Number: Further Mathematics (9FM0)

 

Modern Hebrew A Level

Course Content

• Social Issues & Trends
• Political & Artistic Culture
• Grammar
• Literary Texts and Films

Assessment

Students will study technological and social change, looking at diversity and the benefits it brings. They will study highlights of Israeli artistic culture, including art and architecture, and learn about Israeli politics including political engagement amongst the young. Students also explore the influence of the past on present day Israel. Throughout their studies, they will learn the language in the context of Israel and learn about the issues and influences which have shaped the country. Students will study texts and film and have the opportunity to carry out independent research in an area of their choice.

Assessment tasks will be varied and cover listening, reading and writing skills.

Paper 1: Reading & Writing (2½ hours).  All questions are in Modern Hebrew, to be answered with responses in Modern Hebrew. Translation from Modern Hebrew to English. The Individual research project will be assessed through reading and responding in writing to an unseen question based on a target language source on one of the research topics published in the specification. Students will be required to use information from the source as well as the knowledge gained from their individual research.

Paper 2: Writing (2 Hours).  Literary Works: Students will be required to write two essays on each of the set works studied.

Paper 3: Listening, reading & writing (2½ hours).  All questions are in Modern Hebrew, to be answered with responses in Modern Hebrew. Translation from English to Modern Hebrew.

Expectations

To be accepted onto this course, a minimum of a Grade 6 at GCSE in this subject is required. However, it is highly recommended that students have a Grade 7 or above. The course demands good essay writing skills and a willingness to contribute to discussion in a foreign language. You will be set independent learning tasks every week and will also be expected to carry out your own reading in Hebrew. Students will be expected to read independently, eg. a Hebrew newspaper to keep abreast of current affairs. They will also be expected to spend time each week learning vocabulary and practising new grammar structures.

Examination Board: AQA 

Course Number: 7672

Music A Level

Course Content

The specification aims to encourage students to develop a range of skills, knowledge and understanding needed to communicate through listening, performing and appreciation. It provides a worthwhile course of study to broaden experience, foster creativity and promote personal and social development through musical communication. Through coursework components, students should be able to interpret musical ideas with technical and expressive control, and a sense of style and awareness of occasion and/or ensemble (performing); Develop musical ideas with technical and expressive control making creative use of musical devices and conventions (composing), through music technology and traditional methods; demonstrate understanding of, and comment perceptively on the structural, analytical, expressive and contextual features of music.

The A Level course consists of 3 Units:

Unit 1: Performing Music (Externally assessed, 30% of total A level Mark).  This unit gives students the opportunities to perform as soloists and/or as part of an ensemble. Teachers and students can choose music in any style. Any instrument(s) and/or voice(s) are acceptable as part of an 8 minute recital.

Unit 2: Composing (Externally assessed, 30% of total A level mark).  This unit encourages students to develop their composition skills leading to the creation of two original compositions. One composition is in response to a brief set by Edexcel, the other a free choice composition or in response to a second brief set by Edexcel. The total time for both compositions is 6 minutes.

Unit 3: Developing Musical Understanding (Externally assessed by examination 40% of total A level mark).  This unit focuses on listening to familiar music and understanding how it works. Areas of study include Vocal Music, Instrumental Music, Music for Film, Popular Music and Jazz, Fusions and New Directions. The exam is divided into two sections:

Section A: Three questions related to the set works (audio and skeleton score provided), one short melody/rhythm completion exercise.

Section B: Extended response: Two essay questions, essay one asks students to draw links from their study of the set works to the music heard as an unfamiliar extract. Essay two gives a choice of three questions that ask students to evaluate the musical elements, context and language of one set work. Each option will be from a different area of study.

Expectations

A minimum of a Grade 6 in GCSE Music, or alternatively a Grade 5 practical award and a Grade 5 theory award.

Examination Board: Edexcel.  Course Number: 9MU0

Music Technology A Level

Course Content

The specification aims to encourage students to develop a range of skills, knowledge and understanding needed to create and produce music using technology. It provides a worthwhile course of study to broaden experience, foster creativity and promote personal and social development. Through coursework components, students should be able to create, develop and record musical ideas using a range of technology. Identify and correct errors and misjudgements in the use of technology and demonstrate understanding of, and comment perceptively on the technological and contextual features of recorded music.

The A Level course consists of 4 Components:

Component 1: Recording (Externally assessed, 20% of total A level Mark).  This unit gives students the opportunity to learn how to use production tools and techniques to capture, edit, process and mix an audio recording. One recording between 3 and 3½ minutes is chosen from a list of 10 songs provided by Edexcel. This will involve recording at least seven instruments to create an audio recording of the chosen song.

Component 2: Technology based Composition (Externally assessed, 20% of total A level mark).  This unit gives students the opportunity to create, edit, manipulate and structure sounds into a composition and to develop their composition skills leading to the creation of one original composition. The composition is in response to a brief set by Edexcel and must include synthesis and sampling. The total time for the compositions is 3 minutes.

Component 3: Listening and Analysing (Externally assessed by examination 25% of total A level mark).  This unit focuses on listening to familiar music and understanding how it works. Areas of study include Vocal Music, Instrumental Music, Music for Film, Popular Music and Jazz, Fusions and New Directions. The exam is divided into two sections.

Section A: Listening and Analysing; Four questions based on unfamiliar commercial recordings.

Section B: Extended written response: Two essay questions, one comparing two unfamiliar commercial recordings and one of another commercial recording.

Component 4: Producing and analysing (Externally assessed, 35% of total A level mark).  This is a written and practical exam which tests knowledge of editing, mixing and production techniques. Students will create, correct and combine audio and MIDI tracks to form a completed mix. The written component will focus on testing the application of knowledge of mixing to a specific scenario.

Expectations

A minimum of a Grade 6 in GCSE Music or alternatively a Grade 5 practical award and a Grade 5 theory award.

Examination Board: Edexcel.  Course Number: 9MT0

PE A Level

Course Content

The course content involves the physiology, psychology and socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport. There is also a practical assessment in one sport and students learn how to analyse sporting performance. The course looks in detail at how the human body adapts to exercise effectively and how the structure of the body facilitates sporting movements. There is a psychological focus on how skills are acquired and how sports psychology can be used to improve performance.  The history of sport, the role of sport in society, as well as contemporary issues in sport are all analysed.

The A Level course consists of the following

Physiological factors affecting sporting performance
Psychological factors affecting sporting performance
Socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport
Performance in physical education

Assessment

Physiological factors affecting sporting performance – Exam – 30%
Psychological factors affecting sporting performance – Exam – 20%
Socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport – Exam – 20%
Performance in physical education – Non-exam assessment – 30%

Expectations

Students should be playing one sport regularly as a minimum.  Students should have achieved a grade 6 in GCSE PE.

Examination Board: OCR   Course Number: H555

Performing Arts Cambridge Technical

Course Content

The Cambridge Technical Performing Arts is a vocational course which will provide students with the opportunity, through applied learning, to develop the core specialist knowledge, skills and understanding which are required to work professionally within the performing arts industry. Students will work with performing arts teachers and professional artists. The extended certificate is equivalent to one A-Level. Students must complete a total of 5 units.

Units 1, 2 and 3 are assessed by external assessment and marked by OCR. The remaining units will be internally assessed and externally moderated by OCR.

Unit 1: Prepare to work in the performing arts sector

This unit will give you an understanding of the range and diversity of this industry. You will learn about the jobs and organisations that make up the industry, how it is funded and how companies are supported and regulated. You will learn to self-promote and respond to current employment opportunities as well as learning when and how to adapt to a quickly changing economic landscape.

Unit 2: Proposal for a commissioning brief

You will be given the opportunity to develop a community arts project from a given brief. You will consider your creative skills and preferences and think about how these can be utilised in a way that benefits a community or a defined group of participants who may otherwise have little access to the project’s content.

Unit 3: Influential performance practice

You will learn about genres, styles and periods, social, cultural and historical influences and significant theatrical/performance developments and practitioners. You will become familiar with a range of different styles and periods and will be able to select, adapt and apply elements of your research into your performance concept and practical performance.

Unit 4: Combined arts

You will research into the history of new performance and influential artistic practice. You will study historical and contemporary examples to inspire you to make you own piece of combined art. You will then integrate two or more different art forms or styles of performance into your new reimagined piece of repertoire.

One optional unit from:

• Current issues in performing arts: you will learn how the Performing Arts are influenced by the social and political environment in which they operate and explore practical ways to develop critical thinking skills, and integrate social and political perspectives into your understanding of the Performing Arts Industry.
• Improvisation: you will explore and develop the creative skill of improvisation and understand its place in the development process of performance. It will help you to extend your technical vocabulary and increase your ability to analyse and evaluate.
• Performing repertoire: you will have an opportunity to work within the discipline and demands of a piece of repertoire and be able to put your own mark on the material.

Expectations

Experience of working in a performing arts subject (Dance, Drama, Music) at Level 2 (GCSE, BTEC or CTEC) and a passion for performing arts either as a performer or technician.

Examination Board: OCR

Qualification: Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Certificate in Performing Arts

Physics A Level

Course Content

Core
1. Measurements and their errors
2. Particles and radiation
3. Waves
4. Mechanics and materials
5. Electricity
6. Further mechanics and thermal physics
7. Fields and their consequences
8. Nuclear Physics

Options
9. Astrophysics
10. Medical physics
11. Engineering physics
12. Turning points in physics
13. Electronics

The Physics A-Level introduces students to the fundamental properties and nature of matter, radiation and quantum phenomena. We will introduce the concept of vectors and develop students’ knowledge and understanding of forces and energy. Materials are studied in terms of their bulk properties and tensile strength. Students will cover circular and oscillatory motion, building on the key ideas and knowledge covered earlier in the GCSE and A-Level course, and then the properties and applications of waves are considered. The study of electricity develops previous GCSE studies, provides opportunities for practical work and looks into important applications. Gravitational, Electric and Magnetic fields are investigated, including basic electromagnetic induction. In Nuclear Physics we study the characteristics of the nucleus, the properties of unstable nuclei and how energy is obtained from the nucleus. Students then have the opportunity to study one of the following optional topics to gain a deeper understanding and awareness of a selected branch of physics: Astrophysics, Medical Physics, Engineering, Turning Points or Electronics.

Assessment

There are 3 exams with a combination of theory and practical papers.

Expectations

Minimum of Grade 7 (grade 8’s are highly recommended due to the demanding nature of the course) in all GCSE Science subjects which have been taken whether double award or triple award; plus a minimum of a Grade 7 in Maths. We expect that students studying A-Level Physics will be also studying A-Level Maths.

Examination Board: AQA.    Course Number: 7408

Politics A Level

Course Content

“One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors.” (Plato).  Our innovative Politics curriculum has been designed to provide students with a clear working knowledge of political systems and relationships in the UK and around the globe. On this basis of understanding, students practice their ability to apply ideologies to contemporary political debates. This nurtures the critical thinking skills of our students, as a result they develop a keen sense of their own political evaluations and can defend their views with conviction. Our Politics students are therefore prepared to be active participators in our democracy.

Unit 1: UK Politics
• Political Participation: democracy and participation, political parties, electoral systems, voting behaviour and the role of the media.
• Core Political Ideas: conservatism, liberalism, socialism.

Unit 2: UK Government
• UK Government: the constitution, parliament, Prime Minister and executive, relationships between the branches, and feminism.
Unit 3: Global Comparative Politics
• Sovereignty and globalisation, global governance (political, economic, human rights, environmental), power and developments, regionalism and the EU, comparative theories.

Assessment

Unit 1: Written examination: 2 hours (33.3% of the qualification)
Unit 2: Written examination: 2 hours (33.3% of the qualification)
Unit 3: Written examination: 2 hours (33.3% of the qualification)

Expectations

To be accepted onto the course students need at least a Grade 6 at GCSE English Language and a B grade in one other essay based subject such as History, Geography, Sociology or Jewish Education. The course demands good essay writing skills, an interest in current affairs and the willingness to work hard at school and at home. Students will be set independent learning tasks regularly and will also be expected to carry out their own independent reading. Students will be expected to read a quality online newspaper to keep up to date with political developments.

Examination Board: Edexcel.  Course Number: 9PL0

Psychology A Level

Course Content

People are fascinating. It’s this fact that makes the study of psychology so appealing. Does the human mind intrigue you? What are the main approaches to psychology? What have psychologists found out about the causes of our behaviour? By getting to know the workings of the mind, you are on the way to understanding why humans behave the way they do. Psychology can answer so many questions, from why we develop differently to the underlying causes of conditions such as stress & depression. You will learn to design experiments using psychological methods, evaluate scientific research, analyse and compare different perspectives and deal with ethical issues. This qualification offers an engaging and effective introduction to Psychology. Students will learn the fundamentals of the subject and develop skills valued by Higher Education (HE) and employers, including critical analysis, independent thinking and research.

This A Level course consists of Units 1, 2 & 3:

Unit 1: Introductory topics in psychology.  In this unit you will learn about theories, concepts and research relating to; Social influence, memory, attachment & psychopathology.

Unit 2: Psychology in context.  In this unit you will learn about the different Approaches in psychology the different research methods used by psychologists and focus on the study of biopsychology.

Unit 3: Issues and options in Psychology.  In this unit you will learn about key debates and issues relevant to psychology, as well as one topic from each of the 3 topic areas below:

One from: Relationships; Gender; Cognition and Development
One from: Schizophrenia, Eating Behaviour; Stress
One from: Aggression; Forensic Psychology; Addiction

Assessment

Each unit is worth 33.3% of your overall A-Level grade and will be examined in a 2 hour exam at the end of the 2 years of study.

Expectations

To be accepted onto the course students need at least a Grade 6 in GCSE Maths and English Language and a Grade 6 in Biology.  The course demands good maths and essay writing skills, a willingness to discuss topics and the ability to work and read independently in class and at home.

Examination Board: AQA.  Course Number: 7182

Religious Studies A Level

Religious Studies A-Level enables students to:

• Develop their interest in a rigorous study of religion and belief and relate it to the wider world
• Develop knowledge and understanding appropriate to a specialist study of religion~
• Develop an understanding and appreciation of religious thought and its contribution to individuals, communities and societies
• Adopt an enquiring, critical and reflective approach to the study of religion
• Reflect on and develop their own values, opinions and attitudes in the light of their study.

This A Level course consists of Components A, B and C:

Component A: The study of religion – Judaism
There will be four themes within each option: religious figures and sacred texts; religious concepts and religious life; significant social and historical developments in religious thought; religious practices and religious identity.

Component B: Philosophy of religion
There will be four themes within this component: arguments for the existence of God; challenges to religious belief; religious experience; religious language.

Component C: Religion and ethics
There will be four themes within this component: ethical thought; deontological ethics; teleological ethics; determinism and free will.

Assessment

This is a linear A-Level with 3x2hour exams at the end of year 13.  The three papers are equally weighted.

Expectations

To be accepted onto the course students’ need at least a Grade 6 at GCSE English Language. You do not need to have Religious or Jewish Studies at GCSE, or to hold any particular beliefs: a willingness to engage with religious and philosophical issues in discussion is more important. This course demands good essay writing skills: you will be set essays every fortnight, as well as independent learning tasks every week and will also be expected to read your own academic books on the subject.

Examination Board: EDUQAS

Sociology A Level

Course Content

Sociology is the study of society. The questions it asks include:  How has my sense of identity come about? What does it mean to be a Feminist today? Is the education system fair?  Why have divorce rates increased over time? Why do men account for 95% of the prison population? Is society becoming more secular? Underpinning these questions is an exploration of the ways in which different sociologists see and investigate the social world. In an age of rapid social change and uncertainty – the study of Sociology is as essential now as it ever was. Sociology unravels the mystery of social structures such as class, ethnicity and gender. The course is varied and adaptable; students will acquire a range of valuable skills for higher education: analysis; debate; criticism; empathy; objectivity and essay-writing techniques. Importantly, Sociology reminds students that we should always keep an open mind and question what we see in our world.

The A-Level consists of the following units:

Paper 1:
Education with Theory and Methods. 
As above, with greater emphasis on research methodology.

Paper 2: Topics in Sociology (Families and Households and Beliefs in Society).  In addition to understanding sociological perspectives, A-Level students develop their understanding of issues like secularisation, religious fundamentalism, sects, cults and sociological perspectives on religion.

Paper 3: Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods
Why do some social groups seem to participate in crime more than others? In Crime and Deviance, the focus is very much on understanding the social explanations for why people commit crime and how they are punished. The Theory and Methods element of the unit deepens understanding of the major perspectives; including Feminism, Functionalism, Marxism and Social Action Theories.

Assessment

Assessment for A-Level Sociology is via examinations:

Paper 1: 2 hour exam (33.3%) Short answers and extended writing
Paper 2: 2 hour exam (33.3%) Extended writing
Paper 3: 2 hour exam (33.3%) Short answers and extended writing

Expectations

Students do not need to have studied Sociology at GCSE to study the course. More importantly, students need at least a Grade 6 at GCSE in English Language. The course demands good essay writing skills and a willingness to contribute to discussion. You will be set independent learning tasks every week and will also be expected to carry out your own reading.

Examination Board: AQA.  Course Number: 7192

Spanish A Level

Course Content

With the growth of new technologies our economic, political and cultural horizons have widened dramatically and we now regularly communicate with people all over the world, many of whom do not have English as a first language. Spanish is spoken by 400 million native speakers and is the second most widely spoken language in the world. If you want to develop your ability to converse in Spanish at a high level and to develop your knowledge of Hispanic culture then Spanish is the course for you. It is a useful bridge between almost all subject areas and combines especially well with Mathematics, Geography, History, Business Studies and English.

3.1.1 Aspects of Spanish-speaking society: current trends; 3.1.2 Aspects of Spanish-speaking society: current issues;
3.3 Grammar; 3.4.1 Literary Texts & Films; 3.5 Individual Research Project

A-Level Spanish offers students the opportunity to develop an in-depth knowledge of the language through the exploration of Hispanic culture and society. The curriculum demands students to develop knowledge and an informed opinion on a variety of cultural and social themes in relation to Hispanic countries. This varied and challenging course incorporates the study of two literary works from the fields of Literature and Film. Using the linguistic skills developed in Year 1 students will learn how to analyse and debate the set works in Spanish. In Year 2 students will embark upon an independent research project which allows them to choose a topic of interest related to the key themes of the course and study this in greater detail. The research project will be a unique opportunity to develop individual interests and must be distinct from the topics chosen by others on the course. A comprehensive grammar programme underpins the topic areas to enable students to develop the linguistic skills to use the language independently. Completion of the course will enable students to express their ideas verbally and in writing with a high level of proficiency.

Assessment

Paper 1 : Listening, Reading & Writing (2½ hours)
• Aspects of Hispanic society, Artistic culture in the Hispanic world, Multiculturalism in Hispanic society, Grammar
Questions will require some translation into Spanish and English, summaries in Spanish of written and spoken passages

Paper 2 : Writing (2 Hours)
• Literary Works: Students will be required to write two essays on each of the set works studied. Set works are selected from a prescribed list. Each essay should be at least 300 words in length with no access to the texts or dictionaries.

Paper 3: Speaking (21-23 Minutes)

Expectations

To be accepted onto this course, a minimum of a Grade 6 at GCSE in this subject is required. However, it is highly recommended that students have a Grade 7 or above. The course demands good essay writing skills and a willingness to contribute to discussion in a foreign language. You will be set independent learning tasks every week and will also be expected to carry out your own reading in Spanish. You will be expected to read a quality online newspaper to keep abreast of current affairs and you will also be expected to spend time each week learning vocabulary and practising new grammar structures.

Examination Board: AQA.   Course Number: 7692

Sport Cambridge Technical

Course Content

Designed in collaboration with experts spanning the breadth of the sector, the Level 3 Cambridge Technicals in Sport and Physical Activity focus on the requirements that today’s universities and employers demand. Students will also develop professional, personal and social skills through interaction with peers, stakeholders and clients, as well as theoretical knowledge and understanding to underpin these skills. These support the transferable skills required by universities and employers such as communication, problem solving, time management, research and analytical skills.

Students will consider the barriers to and the effects and benefits of sport and physical activity across all age ranges and social groups, including people with disabilities, so they can tailor their approach depending on the person, people or situation they’re working with to ensure inclusivity. They’ll also learn how to work in a safe and effective way, protecting themselves and those they’re working with from injury or harm.

Units covered

• Body systems and the long and short term impacts of sport and physical activity
• How sport is organised and the purpose of sports development
• Organisation of sports events
• Practical skills in sport and physical activity
– Sports coaching and activity leadership

Assessment

There is a wide range of centre assessed units with practical and wider project-based elements, as well as examined units.

Expectations

Students who choose this course will have an interest and enthusiasm for being physically active, but will also want to develop their understanding of the way in which sport and physical activity is constructed and developed. Organisation skills and communication skills are also valued highly on this course.

Examination Board: OCR

Qualification: Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Certificate in Sport & Physical Activity